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Adult - Justice
| 2013-08-28 00:00:04
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    HOW TO PARTNER WITH GIRL SCOUT AMBASSADORS ON JUSTICE IT’S YOUR PLANET — LOVE IT! A LEADERSHIP JOURNEY

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    Snapshot of the Journey SNAPSHOT OF THE JOURNEY SESSION 1 Toward Justice SESSION 2 Look High, Look Wide The Ambassadors begin to think about what justice asks of each of us as individuals. They examine the ways in which environmental concerns can be ranked based on various needs and perspectives. They go on to explore how desires for justice compete with self-interests. The girls: • create a list of what matters to them about the environment • consider their plans and goals, and how to best customize the journey The Ambassadors find ways to see the big picture of environmental justice issues. As they explore what it means to “sit at every stone” in search of justice, they also consider how a “high and wide” perspective can help them resolve conflicts in their own relationships. The girls: • see how images can be used to tell many different stories • consider what parts of their equations for justice are starting to take shape SESSION 3 Do the Math The Ambassadors identify ways to lighten their step on the planet and make a commitment to follow through and record their results. They explore how Doing the Math can be an effective motivation and communication tool in the quest for environmental justice. The girls: • create a simple survey to explore the environmental concerns of others • create a “guilty habits” list to help them commit to Doing the Math SESSION 4 Be Hawk-Eyed The Ambassadors sharpen their critical eye for environmental issues by learning to look beyond the hype. They also consider how getting the facts can be a good strategy for conflict resolution. The girls: • explore how media and advertising persuades viewers • check in on how they are Doing the Math SESSION 5 Take the Scientific View The Ambassadors investigate the role of science and uncertainty in environmental justice issues by interviewing scientists. The girls: • explore how “expert” opinions intertwine in environmental justice issues • consider what science can and cannot do for the environment 10

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    SESSION 6 Decipher Decisions SESSION 7 What’s the Equation? The Ambassadors explore the complexity of decision-making when various needs compete. Ultimately, they develop ideas about “just decision-making” to add to their growing equations for justice. The girls: • interview decision-makers about the many variables they grapple with • share some of the great decisions they have made in their own lives The Ambassadors access Add It In notes and ideas they’ve made along the journey, create their definition and equation for justice, and choose the audience for their presentation. They also consider some “new equations” for themselves as they talk about what they have learned about career options along their journey. The girls also: SNAPSHOT OF THE JOURNEY • begin planning their final celebration of the journey SESSION 8 Who Will Listen? The Ambassadors continue to plan their presentation to define justice and share an equation for achieving it. The girls also: • discuss how aspects of their equations can also help in addressing conflicts in relationships SESSION 9 Inspiring Justice The Ambassadors share their vision of justice—what it means and how we get it—with others and invite everyone to make strides toward justice by Doing the Math. Following their presentation, girls take time to talk through everything they’ve explored along the journey. The girls also: • celebrate their experience based on their plans —perhaps even “passing it on” in some way to others SESSION 10 Celebrate! The Ambassadors reflect on what they have learned along their journey toward justice, enjoy a closing celebration, and take a look at how they might continue their pursuit of justice. The girls also: • celebrate their experience based on their plans —and consider how to keep their equations and their search for justice growing 11

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    SAMPLE SESSION 3 SAMPLE SESSION 3 Do the Math DO THE MATH AT A GLANCE Goal: Girls identify ways to lighten their step on the planet and make a commitment to follow through and record their results. They explore how “doing the math” can be an effective motivation and communication tool in the quest for environmental justice. They also create a simple survey to explore what other people believe about environmental issues, and what actions they are willing to take to contribute to change. • Opening Ceremony: Overcoming Resistance • Guilty Habits • Do the Math! • Add to the Equation! • Closing Ceremony: Hope and Despair • Looking Ahead to Session 4 • Surveying for More Perspectives MATERIALS • Opening Ceremony: A lightweight 6-foot (or longer) balsawood stick (available at craft supply stores), bamboo garden stake, or thin hollow plastic tube The lighter the better, as this is the “levitation stick”! • Surveying for More Perspectives: Copies of “Writing Surveys: Tips and Examples,” page 56; “Simple List(s)” created during Session 1; paper and pens or markers; computer for writing survey (optional) • Do the Math: Copies of examples, pages 52–53 46

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    SAMPLE SESSION 3 PREPARE AHEAD A math or statistics teacher or expert would be a fun addition to this session, so if the girls recommended one at the end of the last session, make sure they’ve followed through on an invitation. Opening Ceremony: Overcoming Resistance Ask for one or two girls to volunteer as referees. Then divide the remaining Ambassadors into two groups and have them line up shoulder to shoulder in two rows, facing each other, three feet apart. • Have them raise both arms, waist high, with their index (pointer) fingers extended toward, but a few inches to the left or right of, the index fingers of the girls facing them. • Lay the lightweight “levitation stick” (see Materials, page 43) on top of all the extended fingers. Make sure the stick is in contact with all of the girls’ index fingers. If there are a dozen girls, the stick will now be resting on 24 index fingers. It will look a bit like a caterpillar with girls attached! TIMING IS EVERYTHING The Ambassadors are likely finding that resistance is a key factor when trying to change habits to bring about justice—especially when one is trying to get a group to move in the same direction at the same time. This activity puts a fun spin on this challenge and gives the girls a chance to do some team building, too! DO THE MATH • Then tell the girls that the goal of the group is to lower the levitation stick all the way to the ground while NEVER losing contact with any of the girls’ index fingers. If any girl loses contact with the stick with her index finger, the group starts the challenge over at waist height. The referee’s job is to be vigilant about finger contact! Just one slip and the game is restarted. It sounds easy. But what happens is that the harder the girls try to get the stick to the ground, the more the stick stubbornly keeps rising, in defiance of the group’s goal. The girls may laugh, but the stick keeps levitating. How come? 47

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    What It Really Looks Like BOTTLED WATER Do you drink bottled water? Did you know that every gallon of bottled water requires 3 gallons of water just to make the plastic bottle? If you’ve been drinking one bottle of water every day, how much money and water could you save by drinking tap water instead? And what if you could get three other people to pledge to stop drinking bottled water? And what if those three people each got three other people to stop? And what if those nine people each got three more people to stop? How much would all 40 of you save in a year? Your Annual Consumption* 16 fluid ounces of water per day = 1/8th of a gallon (12.5% of a gallon) 12.5% gallon x 365 days = 45.625 gallons 45.625 gallons x 3 (gallons used to make plastic bottles) = 136.875 gallons of water per year for bottles $1 (average cost of a 16–ounce bottle of water) x 365 days = $365 1 plastic bottle x 365 days = 365 bottles YOU People Gallons of water $ Bottles 1 136.875 365 365 3 9 27 Total: 40 *Just pretend you drink one 16–ounce bottle of water per day 52

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