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Adult - MEdia
| 2013-08-28 00:00:14
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    HOW TO GUIDE GIRL SCOUT CADETTES ON MEdia IT’S YOUR STORY — TELL IT! A LEADERSHIP JOURNEY

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    3 Leadership Awards 3 LEADERSHIP AWARDS IF A GIRL MISSES AN AWARD STEP . . . Find a way for her to do something similar to what she missed so she can still earn the award with her group. Your goal is to guide her to have the same learning and growing opportunity—and to understand how she can contribute to the team. You might ask all the Cadettes to brainstorm about how girls who miss steps can get back on track with the journey. On this journey, the Cadettes have the opportunity to earn three awards, all of which build foundational leadership skills critical to moving up the Girl Scout ladder of leadership and becoming lifelong leaders. MONITOR What it means for Cadettes: They have taken stock of media in their world and the influence it has. How Cadettes earn it: They complete three activities that get them to hone in on the role media plays in their lives and the lives of those around them, plus one that considers media in their community. When Cadettes receive it: Session 4 Girls may not experience activities in exactly the same way, but they can each take away new insights, connections, and a sense of accomplishment. INFLUENCE What it means for Cadettes: They understand the importance of having media reflect the realities of their world. How Cadettes earn it: They team up on a MEdia Remake Project to make media that better represents their reality. When Cadettes receive it: Session 9 CULTIVATE What it means for Cadettes: They have made a personal commitment to cultivate a new perspective on media. How Cadettes earn it: They challenge themselves to make a positive change in the way they use media in their lives—a change that they Cultivate so it grows into full-fledged inspiration for others. When Cadettes receive it: The Final Celebration 12

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    The Sample Session plans JOURNEY SNAPSHOT SESSION 1 ImMEdiate Action SESSION 2 Busting Media Stereotypes SESSION 3 “Today’s Top Stories” SESSION 4 Remaking Media: Getting Started SESSIONS 5-7 MEdia Remake: “Rolling” and “Wrapping” It SESSION 8 Our Premiere: This Is It! SESSION 9 The ME in Media SESSION 10 A Better Media Reality THE FINAL CELEBRATION “Mí Día” of MEdia The Cadettes begin to explore their relationship with, and their view of, media. They look at media on and around them. They make viewfinders to play film directors, write “sound bites” for themselves, and plan the journey. The Cadettes confront the media’s criteria for attractiveness and examine which criteria they may have internalized. They start a community media survey and explore stereotypes in media. They write their own definitions of beauty and express it in art works. The Cadettes gain a better understanding of the “story” of media use in their community. They conduct a community media survey and compile the results, moving them toward the Influence Award. They examine news stories, and take a Media Watchdog Pledge. The Cadettes begin to use media to address media concerns. They earn the Monitor Award. They analyze their community survey results and decide on their MEdia Remake Project. The Cadettes team up to use media techniques and tools to “talk back” to the media with a powerful message of their own. As they progress on their MEdia Remake, they document its making. They also visit a media studio, and view “The Golden Eaglet.” The Cadettes share their new view of media and address a community need with their MEdia Remake. They present their MEdia Remake and assess what they’ve learned. The Cadettes write personal MEdia commitments and choose a creative medium to express them in as they move toward earning the Cultivate Award. The Cadettes express their commitment to using media in positive new ways. They also discuss a Girl Scout ad campaign and plan their journey celebration. The Cadettes share their MEdia commitments and celebrate their journey. They earn the Cultivate Award.

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    If you could take action in your community just by hitting a key on a computer keyboard, what issue would you choose to tackle? What cause touches your heart the most, and why? If you surveyed your community to find out what bothers people about media— and what they’d like to change—what did they say? How can you work together to make these changes take root? Now’s your chance to create the MEdia reality —the story—you want for yourself and other girls. So . . . first things first. In what way do you most want to inspire others? That will help determine what you want to remake and why. Look all around and decide on a media issue you want to tackle. Maybe it’s something that turned up when you surveyed your community. Maybe it’s something you’ve noticed that others have ignored. 74 75 4 Remaking media to match their reality—that builds power and confidence. SAMPLE SESSION 4 Remaking Media : Getting Started REMAKING MEDIA: GETTING STARTED Community Counts! Only you know what’s bugging you about the media all around you. So think hard, and think smart! Maybe you want to… …ban stereotypes in a popular prime-time TV show. You could storyboard or script your own episode and you could share it with students in media studies class at your school or a local co lege. And you could also try sending it to the original producers. …stop fashion spreads of unrealistic models. You could create your own real-life spread using real-life models, and share it with a group of younger girls so they can gain a better view of what “beautiful” rea ly means. And then you could send it to the magazine’s fashion editors, too. Or maybe… . a blockbuster movie is way too violent or sexist, or just doesn’t show women in real-life ways. You could use the “movie trailer” format, remake the story line, and then post it online for others to see! … change an ad or ad campaign to debunk unhealthy body-image myths, expose false claims and useless products, or address a harmful advertising-related issue you’ve found in your community. You could create a PSA to counteract any of the above and get it aired on your local TV station. . rewrite a popular song that's with loaded with negative or antiwomen lyrics. You could write your own version and get some air-time for it or pass it around online, and send it to the original writer and performer. . create a new soundtrack for an existing movie, TV show, or commercial because you think the original sends the wrong message. You could combine various kinds of music (classical, techno, pop, country . . ) to create your new soundtrack, one that changes the mood entirely. Pages 74–75, girls’ book AT A GLANCE Goal: The girls begin to use media to correct unrealistic media portrayals and to address a media concern of their community. • Opening Ceremony: Remake/Retake • Earning the Monitor Award • “Watchful Eye” Snacks • Media and Your Community: Analyzing the Survey and Choosing the Remake • Media Remake Possibilities • Closing Ceremony: What Puzzles You? MATERIALS • “Watchful Eye” Snacks: see recipes on page 62 • Media and Your Community: photocopies of the survey questions and answers collected in the previous session; dry-erase board or large sheet of paper; chalk or markers; other project materials as needed (See the project descriptions, and check sheets at the end of this session.) • Closing Ceremony: a Cadette’s inspiring full-page magazine or calendar image—cut into jigsaw puzzles, one piece for each girl 60

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    PREPARE AHEAD Read through the “Your Story, Your Change” section of the girls’ book (pages 68–81), which offers tips, ideas, and examples for the girls’ MEdia Remake project. Seek out Network members to bring the ingredients for the “Watchful Eye” snacks. Go over any preparations the girls have planned to celebrate earning the Monitor award. Prepare your own words of encouragement for the ceremony, such as anecdotes from the journey. AS GIRLS ARRIVE Chat with any assistants about their roles before and during the session. Now have the girl who brought in an inspiring full-page magazine or calendar image cut the image into a number of pieces that matches the number of girls in today’s group—without revealing what the image is. 4 REMAKING MEDIA: GETTING STARTED Opening Ceremony: Remake/Retake Gather the girls in a circle and say: Let’s each share one thing in our day that was so joyful we’d like to do it again. Then let’s share one thing we would “retake” and “remake”—or do differently if we could get a “do over.” Earning the Monitor Award If the girls are ready to receive their awards, suggest that they decide on the awards ceremony. They might read the line most meaningful to them from their Media Watchdog Pledge or from entries in their book. Congratulate Cadettes on their many MEdia Monitor milestones, and on earning the “M” of their “M-I-C.” 61

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    4 REMAKING MEDIA : GETTING STARTED MEdia Remake Project Ideas STEREOTYPE- If girls think there’s too much stereotyping in what they see being made in FREE Hollywood, you might suggest that they turn media stereotypes and negative images TV OR MOVIE from a TV show or movie into positive images of diverse individuals. The girls could cooperate as a group to draft a “story treatment” (media speak for “summary”) of a scene or scenes, and alter characters or situations to be positive, realistic, and relevant. Then, they could write, edit, and polish a script. And finally, operating as a production crew, they could cast, rehearse, perform, and record it. Or they might create a slide show with stills of the girls in costume, acting out scenes from the storyboard. Perhaps a local expert can work with them to animate their stills or storyboards, or edit their video. THE ANTI-AD AD Many girls il say they are worried about tbody and media image. Ifthi this is a big issue for the Cadettes, they might want to expose false claims or address stereotyping or the lack of diversity in advertising. They might choose an ad or ad campaign in any format (radio broadcast, TV spot, bus placards, billboard, magazine ad, or direct mail) that they see as harmful. Then, as a team, they remake it, either to debunk the myths, recast people as individuals with greater potential, or to present the facts about false promises. (Remind them of their “Unmasking Media Stereotypes” activities from Session 2.) Guide the girls to identify the original ad’s target audience and, if possible, suggest that they get their remade ad seen by that audience. For example, if the target audience was Cadette-age girls, then they might show their remake to girls of the same age. Or they might reach a wider circle of girls by e-mailing or posting the ad online. FOUR STARS: AN UNDER- CELEBRATED HERO The celebrity spotlight often leaves deserving individuals in the dark. Encourage the girls to choose an under-celebrated hero (local, global, or historical) and act as “buzz agents” (PR professionals whose job is to generate hype), remaking a specific news story or ad campaign to focus on this individual. The girls could use lines from the Girl Scout Law when describing their hero or in creating their campaign messages. Or they might think back on news stories worth remaking that they discussed in Session 3. They might also consider what complaints about celebrities, if any, their survey revealed, or whether the survey turned up any mention of leaders deserving attention. Or they could check the theme for this year’s “World Thinking Day,” and choose a hero to publicize. Once the girls have chosen a subject, remind them to seek out a professional publicist for expert tips on creating a successful press release or publicity campaign. 64

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