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Adult - Mission Sisterhood
| 2013-08-28 00:00:08
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    HOW TO PARTNER WITH GIRL SCOUT SENIORS ON MISSION: SISTERHOOD! IT’S YOUR STORY — TELL IT! A LEADERSHIP JOURNEY

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    The Sisterhood Award THE SISTERHOOD AWARD WHERE MIGHT GIRLS FIND A SISTERHOOD ISSUE? The best place to look for a sisterhood issue is in a sisterhood. The girls might start with their Girl Scout council and then check out the larger sisterhood of the World Organization of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS). On the WAGGGS Web site (wagggsworld.org/en/issues/ take_action), they can find ways Girl Scouts and Girl Guides are taking action on a global scale. Also, the sample Sisterhood Projects throughout the girls’ book suggest sisterhood issues to tackle. They also step the girls through how to plan a Sisterhood Project that will have positive impact: Finding the Beauty in Images of Beauty, p. 20 Call Out That Inner Beauty, p. 32 Friendship Mentorship, p 43 Friendship Mixer p. 56 But the sample projects are just that—samples. Encourage the girls to use their creativity to find their own by asking around: What issues are women and girls passionate about in their community? On this journey, Seniors have the opportunity to earn the Sisterhood Award, a leadership award that has them exploring the three keys: Discover, Connect, and Take Action! To earn the award, the girls define a sisterhood issue, create a plan for how to Take Action on that issue, and then Take Action! The Sisterhood Award What it means for Seniors: Girls understand the power of sisterhood in their own lives and in the world. As with all leadership awards earned on Girl Scout journeys, the Sisterhood Award gives girls the planing, teamwork, and networking skills they need to pursue the Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest award in the Girl Scouts. The steps to the Sisterhood Award are listed below and detailed on pages 68–73 of the girls’ book. You’ll find a Sisterhood Award icon throughout the Sessions plans to indicate those journey activities that move girls toward the award. STEPS TO THE SISTERHOOD AWARD 1. Define a Sisterhood Issue for Yourself 4. Logistics Time! 2. Develop Your Mission! 5. Creating the Project Timeline 3. Make the Big Decisions! No matter what issue the girls tackle, keep in mind that a great Sisterhood Project gives them the opportunity to: find and think about a sisterhood issue they’ve never thought about before figure out what they can do about a sisterhood issue they care about meet and talk to new people (and that expands their sisterhood!) understand how to focus efforts, so they get results despite obstacles start some change that keeps on going even after they’re done step back and say, “I made this change happen!” be a true example of sisterhood in action! 12

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    THE SAMPLE SESSION PLANS JOURNEY SNAPSHOT SESSION 1 Starting Our Sisterhood SESSION 2 Know Thyself SESSION 3 With Friends Like These . . . SESSION 4 Your Mission Starts Now! SESSION 5 Fit for the Mission SESSIONS 6 & 7 Sisterhood Knows No Boundaries SESSION 8 Making Sisterhood Your Story! SESSIONS 9 & 10 Celebrating the Circle of Sisterhood The Seniors begin to define “sisterhood.” They start a team art project and begin planning the journey. The Seniors learn about being their own best friend. They explore social styles and friendship values. They swap sisterhood concerns and start to observe, discuss, and define sisterhood issues—all of which moves them toward the Sisterhood Award. The Seniors gain greater understanding about friendships. They tally friendship types on a TV show and role-play friendship scenarios. They focus in on an issue for a Sisterhood Project. The Seniors start their Sisterhood Project plan. They explore communication modes in friendships and sisterhood by playing games about txting and body language. The Seniors learn ways to keep themselves and their friendships fit and healthy. They move forward on their Sisterhood Project. The Seniors team up and carry out their Sisterhood Project on their way to earning the Sisterhood Award. They also explore their notions of beauty and possible careers in advocacy, and make button bracelets to symbolize their sisterhood. The Seniors gain awareness of how sisterhood has shaped their life stories. They write one-act plays about sisterhood, craft thank-you notes, and add to their visual Sisterhood Smorgasbord. The Seniors plan their journey celebration. They share all they’ve learned and accomplished with one another, bridging Cadettes, and/or guests of their choice, and earn the Sisterhood Award.

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    Figuring out friendships—of all kinds!—adds to the Seniors’ growing confidence. 3 SAMPLE SESSION 3 With Friends Like These . . . WITH FRIENDS LIKE THESE . . . MAKING THE MOST OF THE GIRLS’ BOOK Chapter 1 of the girls’ book, “Me + Friendship,” will offer the girls a good background for the activities and discussions in this session. Pages 10–11, girls’ book AT A GLANCE Goal: The Seniors gain a better understanding of the importance various types and levels of friendships play in their lives. • Opening Ceremony: What Kind of Friend Am I and When? • Friendships on the Little Screen • Further or Fizzle: Friendship Role-Play • Sisterhood Snack: Perfect Pairings • Creating a Short List for Sisterhood • Closing Ceremony: Thank You, Sister! • Project Planner COACHING TOWARD THE SISTERHOOD AWARD The girls get started on a short list of sisterhood issues in this session, so continue to make use of the Coaching Tips on page 42 to guide them to a meaningful project that will promote sustainable change. And use the Project Planner on pages 50–53 to keep track of all they accomplish. MATERIALS • Friendships on the Little Screen: DVD of TV show the girls plan to watch and DVD player and screen; or Web link and computer with Internet connection (if possible, projector and viewing screen) • Sisterhood Snack: the food pairings your Network prepared • Creating a Short List for Sisterhood: large piece of paper and marker, or chalkboard or whiteboard; copies of “What Makes a Great Sisterhood Project,” page 49 of this guide PREPARE AHEAD • Set up the DVD or Web link for the TV show the girls have decided on for “Friendships on the Little Screen.” • Assemble or finish prepping ingredients for “Perfect Pairings.” 44

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    Opening Ceremony: What Kind of Friend Am I and When? Gather the girls in a circle and ask them to take turns answering the question, What kind of friend am I?, and give an example of when the friendship type they’ve identified comes through strongest. (Example: I am a role model when my younger sister asks me for advice about a difficult situation.) Friendships on the Little Screen Now’s the time for the girls to watch the TV show (or watch/read another media of their choice) they’ve selected so they can identify and tally the types of friendships portrayed in it. After the viewing, get the girls talking about what they’ve seen and tallied. You might ask: • Is it sometimes hard to label a friendship as just one type? LET THE GIRLS DO THE NAMING Pages 12–13 of the girls’ book lists various types of friendships the Seniors are likely to encounter, and the different purposes often tied to friendships: • acquaintance • group friend • good friend • confidante • networking friend • role model • mentor • advisor 3 WITH FRIENDS LIKE THESE . . . • Are some friendships several types? (For example, do confidante and mentor sometimes overlap in the same friendship?) • When can friendships being more than one type pose difficulties? (Example: You’re dating your lab partner and you break up right before the final experiment is due.) • Which types of friendships do you see in your own life? • Which types of friendship don’t you have now but would like to add to your life? Keep these types and purposes handy as the girls hold their opening ceremony, but let the girls come up with their own friendship types—the list here is by no means definitive! 45

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    Mission: Sisterhood! WHAT MAKES A GREAT SISTERHOOD PROJECT? Got some ideas for your Sisterhood Project? Run them through this Project Checklist and see if they meet all the criteria for a Sisterhood Project with impact! Simply ask, Does my project idea . . . ❏ Meet a true need, and involve me (and my team) in a specific solution that’s not so big and broad that we can’t do it and feel the impact? ❏ Seem realistic and is it doable with the time and resources I/we have? Can I fit this project into my busy life? How about my school day? ❏ Allow me/my team to connect with others and expand our sisterhood? ❏ Use my/our talents and skills in new ways? Does it allow me to face a challenge— one I’m excited and enthusiastic about? ❏ Let me educate and inspire others to be involved in this issue, too? ❏ Strive for a sustainable impact? Can the change I start keep on going? ❏ Let me practice advocacy? How? ❏ Incorporate storytelling and creative expression? Can I stretch myself to try a creative medium I have not tried before? Which one? My Ideas . . . 49

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