Share
Girl - aMUSE
| 2013-08-28 00:00:19
1 / 1
  • Share
    Page 1

  • Share
    Page 2

    diva singer mon best friend write poet fashion sty student girl scou itter inventor p You’re a girl, a student, and a Girl Scout Junior. You may also be a singer, writer, athlete, chef, money manager, tech whiz, painter, fashion stylist— maybe even a diva, if you’d ever admit it! But there’s still so much more to your story! What other roles do you want to try?

  • Share
    Page 3

    ey manager girl r chef tech whiz list athlete yogi t junior dancer ainter collector How about an Olympic athlete, or a jet pilot, or a professional dancer, or a crime-solving detective? What would it be like to run a fashion magazine, and be the one who decides what clothes to photograph? Or be a veterinarian, or the town mayor, or an engineer who finds a solution to pollution? Would these roles change the story you could tell about yourself? Would they change how you feel about yourself? Would you feel stronger? Would you walk taller? Would you speak more confidently? There’s only one way to find out! This journey called aMUSE is all about stories. It’s also all about having fun trying on roles, and being a leader who stretches herself to play new parts. You’ll be turning acting into action, too, by inspiring others toward their best roles ever! Inspiring others for the better—that’s the story of Girl Scouts! So places, everyone! The orchestra’s tuning up. The curtain’s about to rise. Get ready to take the spotlight in one of the greatest stories of all— the story of you!

  • Share
    Page 4

    A stereotype is an overly simple view of someone or a group of people, such as saying, “short girls aren’t good at basketball.” If you ever find yourself casting people in certain roles without thinking about them as individuals first, you might be using a stereotype. By the way, did you know that Debbie Black, who is just 5 feet 3 inches tall played professional basketball for 18 seasons? She was the shortest player in the Women’s National Basketball Association league, yet she was named the WNBA’s Defensive Player of the Year in 2001. Movies, TV shows, and even advertisements might cause you to think in stereotypes. For instance, if all the dancers shown in movies, on TV, and in magazines looked the same—all tall and thin, for example—some people might believe that only people who looked that way could be dancers. Stereotypes can prevent people from playing all the wonderful roles that life offers! When in your life have you seen people thinking in stereotypes? How could the world be better if people didn’t think that way? Over a few days or a week or two, keep track of any stereotypes you find around you.

  • Share
    Page 5

    Stereotype Tracker Stereotype Where I found it What I could do to stop it How what I could do would make the world better

  • Share
    Page 6

    You’ve reached out, you’ve spoken out, and you’ve tried out. You’ve seen how creative and powerful both roles and stories can be. Maybe you’ve found some new roles you want to play in your life. With all the new creativity you have, take time to think about all the ways you’re a leader in every part of your life. As you tried on new roles, what did you discover about yourself and the values you live by? What did you enjoy most about connecting with others beyond your Junior group? How did educating and inspiring others also educate and inspire you? What would you like to inspire people to do next? Walk down the red carpet. Give autographs by signing your sister Juniors’ aMUSE journey books. Give a wave to the aMUSE-ing Muses—and all your personal muses who helped you every step of the way! And have fun MUSE-ing about what you want your next role to be!

1 / 1

Please wait