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Girl - Get Moving
| 2013-08-28 00:00:21
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    It’s your planet–love it! A L E A D E R S H I P J O U R N E Y GET This journey belongs to:

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    A building in New Mexico made of adobe, which keeps homes cool in hot climates. Amanda Hall/Robert Harding World Imagery/Getty Images Wind catchers (also called wind towers), like the ones atop the Madinat Jumeirah Hotel in Dubai, have been used in the Middle East since ancient times to cool buildings. 60

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    Investigate Your & Energy in Buildings Building for Energy People are coming up with ways to renovate and build homes, less energy and fewer resources. This is important because buildings account for about 40 percent of all energy use. Plus, heating, cooling, lighting, and running buildings are responsible for 38 percent of the world’s carbon emissions—that’s more than comes from all the cars and “green” buildings are best for the environment. And there’s a twist to this cool new trend. You’ve heard the saying “Everything old is new again”? Well, some of the ideas behind “green” buildings have been around for ages. 61

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    Be Prepared for Your Energy Audit! Give Your Home a Green Once-Over To get ready for the energy audit you and your Junior friends will perform, start with a wide-ranging visual energy audit of your home. Look for leaky windows, and lights and electrical equipment (computers, DVDs, stereos, kitchen equipment) left on or plugged in overnight. What might you suggest your family do to be more energy efficient? Call a family meeting to discuss ways to save energy, such as: Trees on a home’s south and west sides shade it in summer and block wind in winter. The average home’s power use emits 22,000 pounds of greenhouse gases each year —twice as much as a car. TVs, DVDs, and computers eat up 15 percent of a home’s energy use. They suck energy even when off. 70

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    Half of home energy use goes to heating and cooling. So lower your thermostat in winter and raise it in summer. Up to 30 percent of a home’s heat escapes through a fireplace chimney. A computer on sleep mode adds $70 to annual electricity costs. Turn it off! Longer showers use more energy—to heat the water. Double-paned windows and insulation keep a house warm in winter and cool in summer. A ceiling fan uses just 75 watts per hour! An open fridge door wastes 215 watts of electricity per hour. Most energy used to wash clothes just heats the water. Dirty air filters in furnaces waste energy. 71

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    Moving Right Along! You’ve investigated energy all around you: the energy you use the energy in all your places and spaces the energy of getting everywhere you go What have you discovered about who you are and the values you stand for? 111

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